You Can’t Just Be Spiritual; You Need Religion

This post may contain affiliate links. This means that if you make a purchase from Amazon after clicking one of the links, I will receive a small commission at no additional cost to you. You can read more details here. However, all opinions expressed in the posts are my own. Thank you for supporting Stumbling Toward Sainthood.

I always experience mixed emotions when I hear someone say (or see someone post) something along the lines of “I’m spiritual, but not religious.” On one hand, I am happy that the person is seeking a deeper meaning in their life. On the other hand, I’m worried that the person will stay satisfied there.

Before I continue, I want to define spirituality and religion. The University of Minnesota shares this Venn Diagram.

While the article it is from emphasizes spirituality as good for emotional well-being, I think they (perhaps unknowingly) made an important distinction: spirituality is what I believe and how I find meaning in regards to a higher power while religion is how I live out the truth and what is right in regards to a higher power.

Spirituality is absolutely necessary and a critical part of being religious, but it isn’t enough on its own. Especially as Christians, we should question spirituality without religion because Christ very intentionally established a Church for us. That alone should be a sufficient reason to recognize the necessity of religion, but there are three more reasons we should be both spiritual and religious.

Christ very intentionally established a Church for us. Click To Tweet

1) We can gain an intimate knowledge of Christ.

God made us to know Him and seek Him. I t is a huge part of our lives; in fact, it is our purpose as human beings. Even people in the depths of the rainforest who never encounter a Christian can still be drawn to a higher power. However, by being part of a religion, we can learn who Christ truly is. We can find answers to our questions and learn more about Him more effectively than if we just wander on our own.

As Catholics, we are able to have the most intimate connection with Christ through His presence in the Eucharist. Without the (Catholic) Church, we cannot have that incredibly intimate connection in the form of the Eucharist. This is not to say that other connections with Christ aren’t good or beautiful or necessary; rather, it is recognizing the incredible gift of Christ’s body that is available to us that wouldn’t be accessible without the Church.

2) We are better protected from evil.

The reality is that we are broken people. We can have inaccurate ideas of who God is. Having religion helps us know what is truly right and wrong, even if it is difficult to accept. Without proper guidance, we can misinterpret Scripture. When we allow our own desires to supersede what God desires for us, we find the fractures in our faith communities. Obviously, churches can fail and do things like vote on moral beliefs, but when we follow a particular religion (specifically Catholicism), we are on a better road towards Christ’s kingdom. Left to our own devices, we come up with weird crap like Scientology.

3) We need a Christian community.

Having a community is a very important part of worship and Christian living. Being part of a Christian community provides us with encouragement to grow closer to Christ and support in our struggles. People can grow closer to Christ together through classes, Bible studies, programs, and more.

A community is a very important part of worship and Christian living. Click To Tweet

***

Again, my point isn’t that spirituality is bad. We need spirituality, too. If religion is just a bunch of rules and doesn’t have spiritual practices, it is also lacking. There are even differences in spiritual expression within a religion. For example, some Catholics may embrace Ignatian spirituality while others may prefer a rosary walk. There is beauty in the diversity of these expressions.

Ultimately, however, when we recognize that religion allows us to be in a relationship with God as He desires it and see the fruits, we will truly be living more spiritually fulfilling lives.

If you want to read more about spirituality vs. religion, here are two more posts (Catholic News Agency and Our Sunday Visitor). If you are spiritual but not religious, here is a great post by an atheist-turned-nun.

On a somewhat related note, here are two great responses to the misguided “Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus” spoken word video:

  1. Bishop Barron’s response video
  2. Catholic Stuff You Should Know podcast response

 

What are your thoughts? Why do you think we don’t need religion? What Christian spiritual practices do you enjoy?

You can't just be spiritual you need religion

Comments 8

  • This is an excellent post on an important topic. A pastor once said that a lone-ranging Christian is exposing himself or herself to danger and may not last very long in the faith. #enoughsaid

    • Thank you for sharing. I definitely agree with that pastor. While every Christian needs to have a personal relationship with Christ, we need our faith communities to preservere.

  • While I respect your thoughts on spirituality versus religion, I believe that if someone doesn’t find a religion/church that is following the Bible, then they would be better to remain spiritual in themselves instead of trying to identify with something that isn’t truly of Christ and could lead them away from God ultimately. Of course, my thoughts are based off of my perception of spirituality, which is not the same as the definition represented by your Venn diagram.

    • Coleen,

      I agree that spirituality is better than complete disbelief or falling away from God, but I think there is a danger is following our own beliefs rather than following what truly comes from Christ. I think that in reality, some of the teachings of Christianity are difficult to follow. I think religion plays a really important role is sharing the truth, even though it is difficult. Christ promised the Holy Spirit would be with us, but He also established a Church to help us.

      However, I can understand that if you have a different understanding of spirituality, it could lead you to a different point. What is your perception of spirituality?

      Thanks for reading and commenting!

  • Thank you for this. Personally, I know many spiritual people who accept many religions.. Buddhism, Judaism, believing all are one. Whereas being religious, you’re more set in stone.

  • It’s so true about the importance of religion and spirituality being equally important, and too much emphasis of one over the other causing problems.

    Your post reminds me of a quote that a priest friend shared with me recently from St. Gregory Palamas: “I notice that the Apostle Thomas lost his faith when he was absent, but when he was together with the believers his faith did not in any way fall short… if only a singer will flee the company of immoral men and associate with the just, he will never be found lacking in righteousness or the resultant salvation of his soul… so let us, brethren, meet together and often come to God’s church where all who are truly godly are present and never stay away.” The Church and religion gives us the tools to direct our spirituality.

  • Interesante. Me ha encantado, muchas gracias.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

I'd love to hear from you! My goal is to make this blog useful for you, and part of that is having conversations, even if you disagree with me. I welcome disagreement, but please read my commenting guidelines first so we can have a civil and fruitful conversation. Thank you!